Why do most 16-year-olds drive like they’re?

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Missing A Part of Their Brain?  BECAUSE THEY ARE.

This is a great article from Allstate Insurance Company.  Below is the content from the article you can also download directly at – https://www.allstate.com/content/refresh-attachments/Brain-Ad.pdf.

Even bright, mature teenagers sometimes do things that are “stupid.”

But when that happens, it’s not really their fault. It’s because their brain hasn’t finished developing. The underdeveloped area is called the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex. It plays a critical role in decision making, problem solving and understanding future consequences of today’s actions. Problem is, it won’t be fully mature until they’re into their 20s. [This is one reason we at DrivingMBA strongly suggested that teen drivers get proper training and do not begin having passengers in the car until after the age of 18 or after a year of solid driving record.]

It’s one reason 16-year-old drivers have crash rates three times higher than 17-year-olds and five times higher than 18-year-olds. Car crashes injure about 300,000 teens a year. And kill nearly 6,000. Is there a way for teens to get their driving experience more safely—giving their brains time to mature as completely as their bodies? [DrivingMBA thinks so and that is why we developed our driver training program. We believe a service that can truly save the lives of children is worth every penny.]

Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) laws are one approach that’s been proven effective at reducing teen crashes. These laws restrict the more dangerous kinds of driving teens do, such as nighttime driving and driving with teen passengers. Since North Carolina implemented one of the most comprehensive GDL laws in the country, it has seen a 25% decline in crashes involving 16-year-olds.

To find out about the GDL laws in Arizona please visit – http://www.azdot.gov/mvd/driver/gdl/gdl.asp

Let’s help our teenagers not miss out on tomorrow just because they have something missing today.

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